Wednesday, 29 May 2013

Hedgerow Project - Revisited

Back in March of last year I decided to run an informal monthly survey of the hedgerow that follows the line of the little country lane that run past our cottage in the secret valley.  Parts of the lane are an ancient 'green' road and would have been busy with drovers herding their sheep and cattle to market.  There are only two houses in our part of the valley and the other is reputed to be an old drovers' inn.  Our place was built a lot more recently in the 1850's so may just have witnessed the passing of the tradition as livestock began to travel along the more direct and newly created turnpikes.  It was also necessary for the secret valley to have a more direct route to the turnpike and a new road was built that went past the little winding river in the header photo above.  Where it joined the turnpike it was marked by a white gate and even though it was removed a hundred years or more ago we still talk of turning left or right 'by the white gate'.  This is rather confusing to those unaware of the history behind the expression - it took me two years before I found out why I could never see it!  In the decades that followed the 'old road', as it is now known, became disused and is now part of the footpath and bridleway networks used by walkers and horse riders.



Drove roads can be very ancient indeed and they were often marked by hedgerows to provide shelter and food and to prevent stock from straying.  These were often linear strips of the original wildwood left after the remainder of the trees had been clear felled - in our case, the Wychwood Forest.  As a result, the wild flowers associated with these ancient woodlands have survived nestling in the hedgerow bottom giving a good indication of their history.  So sensitive are these plants to change that it is possible to follow the line of the original road by the flora growing alongside it.  Although the newer parts of our lane - now probably two hundred years old - are also lined with hedges of equal stature, the plants have yet to colonise.  To record these changes was the initial idea behind my hedgerow project.



Like all plans, it didn't quite work out.  In my first and only blog post about the project, I described March as being warm and dry; in fact it was hotter than normal and then turned out to be the hottest month of the year.  In April, the weather turned cooler and, on the day that drought was officially declared, it began to rain until the year was declared the wettest ever recorded.  This coupled with other commitments and the commissioning of my book on gardening meant the idea was abandoned to be resurrected this year.  That hasn't gone quite to plan either!



So rather than set myself the unrealistic target of recording on a specific day of each month, I shall satisfy myself with just taking photographs when I either have the time or feel in the mood.  Not scientific, I know - and certainly not disciplined - but the pleasure I get from walking along the lane every day is not just because of the plants I see.  For me, it is knowing that I'm following an ancient track that has been trodden by countless generations of hard working countrymen.  Some of the trees I pass are the same as when they walked by; the secret valley still echoes to the sounds of sheep and cattle and the little winding river waters them and refreshes sore, tired feet on a hot, summer's day.  It is twelve years since I came to the secret valley and it is still releasing its secrets.  How many times have I walked along a sunken track above the house to a rough patch of uncultivated land? Now recently learnt, I know it is the site of a Bronze Age settlement and the thought that this special place has been home to us lucky few for three thousand years or more is a humbling and joyous experience.




To view the original post from March 2012, click here.




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Monday, 20 May 2013

BBC Oxford Interview with Phil Gayle

I'm being interviewed on BBC Oxford  on Tuesday 21st May. 

Talking to Phil Gayle about career changes and the people that influence them – in my case the change from fashions to flowers.

“What or who changed your life? Phil Gayle hears from someone who got lost on a bike ride and it changed the direction of their life” - this refers to my eventual arrival on a remote hill farm on Exmoor at the age of 16.


To listen to the interview click here






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Saturday, 11 May 2013

Turf Burning

For gardeners, peat is a well-known, although less used than before, mainstay of seed and potting composts.  It's ability to absorb large quantities of moisture and to retain nutrients plus being very light when dry, thereby reducing transportation costs, made it the perfect growing medium.  In recent times, the environmental impact of industrial scale peat extraction has given rise to concern leading to the development of alternative composts becoming available.

Exmoor's rolling moorland: a wild, windswept and boggy place

In the areas where peat is found - mostly in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere - it was also a common fuel source and is still used for this purpose today.  On a non-commercial scale peat for burning is also in decline as the hand digging of the bogs, the drying out process and the carting all takes time for very little financial gain.  The days of the 'turf cutter' being paid sixpence a load have long passed.

Turf cutting creates deep trenches across the bogs

On Exmoor, in England's West Country, peat is always referred to as 'turf', a dialect word, that means something very different from the velvety, green sward of gardeners.  Turf was still being cut there into the 1970's and was one of the very first tasks I was given when arriving as a lad to work on a remote hill farm.  It was back breaking labour turning the individually cut pieces over and over to allow the wind to dry them before stacking them in heaps which later would be carried back to the farm to supply the fires that were needed all year for both heating and cooking.

 Cut turf in Ireland's Connemara

Despite the backache, it was an enjoyable time being up on the moors all day with just the sound of the wind and the curlews mournful cry for company.  The native Exmoor ponies and the wild Red Deer all would appear from time to time for you became part of the moorland scenery too. Returning to the farm tired after a hard day's work to be greeted by the sweetly fragrant smoke from the turf fires within was reassurance enough that it was all worthwhile.


 
Curlew and Red Deer on Exmoor
 
Last summer a visit to Connemara, on the west coast of Ireland, brought back all these memories for there turf burning is still commonplace.  There were the rows of turf lying on the ground waiting to be wind-dried, there were the stacks of turf waiting to be carted.  And, best of all, there was the heady smell of dozens of peat fires wafting over the landscape. 

Connemara turf stacked ready for carting - cut to a very different shape to Exmoor

Recently, on Exmoor, it has been realised that turf cutting kept the bogs 'open' providing a valuable wildlife resource and although not reinstating the practice the National Park has instigated the Exmoor Mire Restoration Project. This has involved blocking old drainage systems and re-wetting over 300 hectares; the project is on-going.  Visit there website by clicking here to find out more.

The trenches fill with water creating a very special and rare wildlife habitat

Exmoor is still as beautiful as ever and my love for it never diminishes but, without the scent of the turf fires, there is that little 'something' missing.  However hope may be around the corner: the entrepreneurial Irish are selling peat incense blocks by mail order so that you can have the scent anywhere.  I may even take a few blocks and light them on Exmoor for old times' sake.






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Thursday, 2 May 2013

Being Interviewed on BBC Radio Oxford

I was a guest of Kat Orman on BBC Radio Oxford today, being interviewed about my forthcoming book, Why Can't My Garden look Like That?, and also the career change from fashions to flowers.

One of the questions Kat asked was had I ever had a 'Lady Chatterley' moment.  You will have to listen to the interview to find out my response!

To listen to the programme  click here.  I am on air at 2:07:00.  The programme is only available for a few days so you'll need to be quick...




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